What is a Quiet Zone?

A quiet zone is a section of a rail line that contains one or more consecutive public crossings at which locomotive horns are not routinely sounded.

Who Can Establish a Quiet Zone?

The public authority with jurisdiction for the roadway at the crossing can authorize the creation of a quiet zone. If the quiet zone includes more than one public authority, all agencies must agree and actions must be taken jointly. Also, quiet zones may be established irrespective of state law.

How are Quiet Zones Created?

Local governments have two ways of creating a quiet zone. One, show that the lack of a train horn does not pose a significant safety risk or implement safety measures to reduce excess risk associated with the lack of a train horn such as the Automated Horn System™ .

How much does it cost to create a Quiet Zone?

This is a question communities need to have addressed before they decide to make a commitment of both time and financial resources. Quiet Zone Technologies can assist communities in the development of a comprehensive quiet zone evaluation for each of their rail corridors. This plan includes an overview of the current rail operations, a site visit, budgetary cost estimates for all acceptable treatments, a summary of the most cost effective treatments and a list of procedures the public authority will need to follow to establish their Quiet Zone. Although there are different methods available to creat a Quiet Zone, it is Quiet Zone Technologies' philosophy is that it is important to treat every crossing within a proposed quiet zone corridor.

What are the Types of Quiet Zones?
  • Pre FRA Ruled Quiet Zones: Areas without train horns on
    October 9, 1996 and on December 18, 2003

  • Intermediate Quiet Zones: Areas without train horns after
    October 9, 1996 and before December 18, 2003

  • New Quiet Zones: Quiet Zones that do not qualify as Pre-Rule
    or Intermediate Quiet Zones

  • Partial Quiet Zones: A Quiet Zone where the train horns are not routinely sounded for a specified period of time during the evening and/or nighttime hours (10pm-7am).

What is a Wayside Horn?

A wayside horn like the AHS™ is a stationary horn located at a rail crossing, designed to provide, upon the approach of a locomotive or train, audible warning to oncoming motorists of the approach of a train.